How to Destroy a New Linkedin Connection

The entire purpose of Linkedin is to connect with other people to – in some way, shape or form – grow your business. So it is a normal, everyday occurrence to request connections with new people.

Some folks do this well. Some do it okay. And some just suck!

Here is an example of suckage:

A young lady sent me the generic Linkedin connection invitation back about 4 months ago. Within a few days I reviewed her profile, agreed to connect and sent a short note saying basically ‘Thanks. How can I help you?’

I heard nothing for 4 months.

Then yesterday she sends me an InMail with the subject line: “Need more funds for your business?”

I knew this was gonna suck!

- Here is the babbling text with my insights -

Hi Erik,

Nice to connect with you! I am working with a successful, seasoned entrepreneur, who is the founder of this (X). He has assisted over 5,000 people in 4 short months to raise donations to…..

Did I ask?

Crowd Funding is a legal and unique way to gather donations to help you get your business started and help to keep it going during lean times…

Wow, crowd funding 101! Who cares?

(x) platform is free to join; the only fees you will encounter will be the processing fees for money exchange from a 3rd party processor. There are no platform fees….

Oh God, here we go…!

This Crowd Funding platform provides a system that is unmatched in the industry, with its unique contribution distribution formula that helps people raise funds easier and faster.

Please, let me step out of your way while you blow that horn!

There are only 3 simple steps involved.

How many steps to get you to STOP?

If you or anyone you know is interested in receiving funds for a project or start up business or looking to make a new career (part time or full time) tackling the economic crisis, either let me know or pass my information along.

Oh sure! I feel so endeared to you now that I can’t wait to inflict you on my friends.

Thank you for your time.

Ya, right!

Sincerely,
(Name removed to protect the “innocent”)
Business Growth Consultant

Don’t quit your day job!

As you see she made a few key mistakes:

1. She went MIA for 4 months
2. Her reply wasn’t a reply to my question, it was an unabashed pitch of her service
3. She did not try to create curiosity or connect what she does to any problem I have or care about
4. She babbled on…
5. She half-assedly requested referrals before checking to see if I was onboard with her
6. She annoyed me

So, take a look at your InMail “replies” to new connections. Are you really connecting? Are you looking to have conversations that can help both of you? Or are you (like my friend here) just looking to use Linkedin as a giant free database of unqualified leads?

Here are 3 simple concepts that should help when crafting replies to new connections on Linkedin:

1. Think of the other person - Will the subject of your message be something the prospect cares about? If not, don’t send it.

2. Connect for Real - Forget pitching people. Either start a dialogue via InMail or (as I prefer) schedule a call so you can really talk and bond.

3. Keep it short – No one is looking for a babbling Inmail from you. If it requires length to discuss, have a call. If you don’t care enough about the other person to speak with them, get lost!

The opportunity to truly connect with a valuable business contact is immeasurable. This person could end up not helping you, or help you close millions of dollars in sales, or become a dear friend. You never know. So put in some effort.